I’m terrible at keeping track of where I left off – Elizabeth B.

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We all lose track of where we left off with our projects from time to time. We live in a time where everything moves so fast and sometimes our crochet suffers for it. Things come up. We put our work down because our child needs something or the phone rings. It happens. I know it

We all lose track of where we left off with our projects from time to time. We live in a time where everything moves so fast and sometimes our crochet suffers for it. Things come up. We put our work down because our child needs something or the phone rings. It happens. I know it can be frustrating spending time trying to figure out what row or which stitch you should work next when you just want to sit down and start stitching. Worse, you might have to rip back your work to figure out where to start again. It’s certainly a pain, but don’t beat yourself up too much.

However, it sounds like this is happening to you a lot. If you are constantly losing track of where you left off, maybe examine the reason or reasons behind it. Once you understand the why behind it, then you can tackle it and find a solution.

So, why do you lose track? Do you get bored or frustrated with the project and just put it away? Do you think you’ll be right back but then you don’t get back to it for a day, a week, or longer? Or maybe you don’t have a tracking system in place for when you stop working on a project to note where you left off? Understanding what is behind why you lose track is key to taking steps to correct it.

Now that you understand why you lose track, you can develop a process that fits your needs. Here are some suggestions to get you get started and to maybe spur some more ideas to help you create your own tracking system:

  1. Build in regular scheduled breaks. I like this one because it’s a more proactive solution. You work to the end of the row or pattern repeat or a place in the pattern you choose, then take a break for a drink of water, rest your wrist, take the dog out, or check on the kids. This way you are staying healthy, staying ahead of family responsibilities, and can easily pick up where you left off when you have time to return.
  2. Make detailed notes. In this system, you make notes on the pattern or write out on a note-card what you did last and what to do next, then place it in your project bag with the yarn and hook. This can seem like a pain when you’re thinking you’ll be right back. But the truth is, things happen to keep us away from our crocheting longer than we plan and this way there will be no confusion.
  3. Record a voice memo. I have so many things on my mind and on my to-do list that I find myself making a lot of voice memos on my phone. It’s a quick and easy way to tell your future self what you’ve done and what to go next.
  4. Use stitch markers. Get some pretty and fun stitch markers and pin at the beginning and end of pattern repeats. You’ll have some pretty crochet jewelry for your project as well as be able to have a point of reference in your pattern.

Elizabeth, I know these are not new and radical ideas. However, the trick is to use them. You just need to pick something and stick with it. Regardless of the system you decide to use, just remember to be consistent and you’ll never lose track of where you left off again.

What do you think of these suggestions? Which one would you use and why? Can you add any?